Curriculum Unit:

Word-Processing





Year 7 Discrete Course in

Information Technology



September 1996















Designed for:



St. John's Comprehensive School

Epping, Essex







Designed by:



Michael Coady

 

Activity 1



Writing a Poem



Poetry has a way of saying something meaningful and significant using language in an 

original way.   Poetry can be described as painting pictures with words.  You try to capture a 

scene and/or a feeling by describing it and making it come alive for another person.  

Language can be used that appeals to our senses - words which give images that one can 

see, hear, taste, touch, smell.   For example:



*	see - The summer flowers bow to each other and dance in the lakeside breeze.



*	hear - The chainsaw snarled and rattled in the backyard.



*	taste - The little boy squirmed as the lemon juice seized his taste buds.



*	touch - Sue felt a moist brush of sandpaper roughness on her cheek as her cat's 

tongue roused her from sleep.



*	smell - Fresh baked bread wafted its warm doughy scent throughout the house.





Now start thinking about a poem that describes the sights, scents, sounds, tastes and touches 

of any topic you choose or of one of the following topics:



*	An Outdoor Market (What noises do you hear?  What do the people dress like?  What 

colors do you see?  What do you smell?  Is it a hot or cold day? How do you feel?  Etc.)



*	After a Spring Rain Shower (What do the grass and trees look like?  What do you smell?  

How does it feel to walk through the streets and/or the fields? Etc.)



*	Autumn (What are the colors, sights, sounds, feelings and ideas that come to mind when 

you think of autumn?)



*	Starting the School Year (How do you feel?  Nervous?  Excited?  Disappointed?  Who 

will be there the first day? What are the noises you will hear? The sights you will see? 

etc.)



We will use the word processor to help us create and produce this poem.



 

Word Processing Your Poetry

Word Processing Skills used:

*	loading the program

*	entering text from keyboard

*	highlighting text

*	cutting and pasting text

*	saving your document





A Word Processor can help us to organize our ideas and to present them in a readable, 

attractive form.  We will use Microsoft Word 2.0 to record our ideas about our poem as they 

pop into our heads as we brainstorm about our topics. So, . . .



1.	At the Program Manager window, load Microsoft Word 2.0 by double clicking on the Word 

icon with your mouse.



2.	Once you have the program running, start typing into the computer as they occur to you all 

your ideas about the sights, smells, sounds, tastes and touches of your topic.



3.	When you have collected so many ideas, images or phrases, you may want to rearrange 

them in a different order or combine them to create a certain flow, effect or meaning to 

your words.  Here is how you can move these words or phrases around:



*	use your mouse to point to the first letter in the word or phrase you want to move.  

Holding down on the left mouse button, drag your mouse across the word or 

words, you want to move, highlighting them in black.  Release the mouse button.



*	With the mouse, click on the Edit menu at the top of your screen.  Select Cut.  

The word or phrase will disappear.

*	With the mouse pointer, click to place the cursor where you want the word or 

phrase to appear.  Click on the Edit menu again and Select Paste.  The word or 

phrase will reappear in this spot.



Try moving things around using this method.









 

Saving your Poem



Now that you have a start on your poem, you will want to save it to work on it again later:



1.	Use your mouse to open the File menu and select Save.  Name the new file you have 

started poem1.doc and click OK.  A window will then appear, asking you to give more 

details on the type of file you are saving.  At the title line, type poem1.doc.  Click on  the 

subject line and type word processing poetry.  Click OK.







Activity 2



Formatting your Poem with the Word Processor



With the final draft of your poem completed, you may now begin to format it with the word 

processor to make it look presentable.  Your poem should appear in the centre of the page, 

centred from left to right, top to bottom.  It could look like the formatted poem on the following 

page:



 

The Writer of This Poem



The writer of this poem 

Is taller than a tree

As keen as the North wind

As handsome as can be



As bold as a boxing-glove

As sharp as a nib

As strong as scaffolding

As tricky as a fib



As smooth as a lolly-ice

As quick as a lick

As clean as a chemist-shop

As clever as a T



The writer of this poem 

Never ceases to amaze

He's one in a million billion

(or so this poem says!)



			Roger McGough 

 

Activity 2 (contd.)



Formatting your Poem with the Word Processor



Word Processing Skills used:

*	loading the program

*	entering text from keyboard

*	highlighting text

*	changing font and size of characters

*	using the TAB key to set out work

*	using Page Set-up and Section Layout

to change margins and vertically centre text

*	using the Spell Checker

*	saving your document

*	printing your document





Trying formatting your poem in the same manner as the poem on the previous page:



1.	Load the Word program from the Program Manager window by double clicking on the  

icon.

2.	Once you have loaded the program, use your mouse to open the File menu and select 

Open.  From the Filename window, select poem1.doc or type poem1.doc at the filename 

line and click OK.  

3.	You should type the title of your poem at the top on a separate line followed by a space.  

Your name should follow at the end of the poem after a line space.

4.  Change the font size and style of the title of your poem to distinguish it and make it stand 

out:

*	Highlight the title of your poem with your mouse pointer as you did when cutting and 

pasting (in Activity 1, step 3).  

*	Click on Format to show the menu and select Character.  At the Font box, click on 

the down arrow to show all the different types of font styles you can choose from.  

Scroll through them and select one.  The sample window should show you what it 

will look like.  

*	Click on the arrow next to the points box and select 18 for your font point size.  Click 

OK.

5.	Indent your name at the bottom of your poem to set it in from the left margin:

*	Use the mouse pointer and click at the beginning of your name to place the cursor

*	Press the tab key 2 or 3 times to move your name in from the left.

6.	Try to adjust your left margin so that the poem appears to be horizontally centred on the 

page (that is, centred from left to right on the page):

*	Open the Format menu at the top and select Page Set-up.

*	Click in the left margin box and change the value to 3" . Click OK. (Note:  You 

may have to adjust this value.  Perhaps 3" may move the poem in too far or not far 

enough from the left.  It may not appear in the centre of the page.  To check how it 

will appear from left to right on the page, open the File menu and click on Print 

Preview.  You may have to go back and readjust the left margin value.)

7.	Now adjust the poem so that it appears to be vertically centred on the page  (that is, 

centred from the top to the bottom of the page):

*	Open the Format menu at the top and select Section Layout.

*	In the Vertical Alignment box, select center. Click OK.

8.	Check the spelling in your poem and edit any mistakes:

*	Open the Tools menu and click on Spelling.  You may be asked, "Do you want to 

continue checking at the beginning of the document?"   Click Yes.

*	The words that the Spell Checker will question are not necessarily spelled wrong.  

You will have to use your judgement on this.  The Spell Checker will present you 

with suggestions for changing the spelling of certain words.  You must click on the 

correct suggested word and click Change (if the word is misspelled and you wish 

to change it) or you can choose to click Ignore (if the word is actually spelled as 

you mean to spell it and you wish to ignore the suggestion).

Read through the poem once again and make sure there are no spelling mistakes or typing 

errors.  This should prepare your poem for presentation in a nicely readable format.





 

Saving Your Work

If you have not done so already, you should save your work now.  It is recommended that you 

should save your work often to avoid losing it if something goes wrong with your computer or 

with the network.  Saving your work every 10 - 15 minutes is a good practice.

Do you recall how to save your work from Activity 1?  Try to do so.  Another quick and easy 

way to save your work would be to take your mouse pointer and click on the icon (picture) of 

the floppy disk in the top left corner of your screen (the third icon from the left on the toolbar).



Printing Your Work

With your poem completely formatted, try printing it.

9.	Open the File menu and select Print Preview.  This will give you a look at how the whole 

page should look when printed.  Ensure that the centering of the poem looks right from left 

to right, top to bottom.  You may have to re-adjust margins.

10.	From this screen (with the reduced view of your page), click on the Print button, top left.  

This will give you another window.  Click OK.  Check the hard copy of your poem.



For Homework:

Think of all the excuses that you have ever used for not having your homework done.  Write 

them down.  Create as many wild and original new excuses as you can think of.  You should 

at least have a total of eight.  See if you can make the last word of each excuse rhyme with 

the last word of the next so that you have pairs of rhyming excuses.  This will be your 

Homework Excuses poem.  You may want to begin it with:

Dear Sir (Madam),

I am very sorry to have to say

My homework is not done today

Because:



*	List each of your excuses . . .

*	about your homework abuses!

 

Activity 3



Word Processing Your "Homework Excuses" Poem



Word Processing Skills used:

*	loading the program

*	entering text from keyboard

*	using Bullets and Numbering

*	highlighting text

*	changing font, size and color of characters

*	using Page Set-up and Section Layout

to change margins and vertically centre text

*	using the Spell Checker

*	saving your document

*	printing your document





You are going to design your Homework Excuses poem in such a way that each excuse has 

its own unique appearance on the page.  Using different colors, font styles and 

sizes, make each excuse look different.



1.	Load the Word program from the Program Manager window.



2.	Once you have loaded the program, open a new document by going to the File menu and 

selecting New.  Click OK at the window that asks if you will use the Normal template.



3.	Start typing your Homework Excuses poem.  Separate each excuse by using Bullets 

and/or Numbering, for example:



*	The mice in my attic shred it to use for their nest.

OR

1.	Aliens landed and took my homework as a speciment of excellence for their 

schools.



You can do this simply by using the Toolbar  (the strip of icons below the menu bar which 

contains the File, Edit, View . . . pulldown menus): 



a.	On the Toolbar, find the icon with the numbers 1, 2, 3 and lines opposite these 

numbers and next to it the icon with the square bullets and lines opposite the bullets.  



b.	Before you start typing each excuse, click on one of these icons with your mouse it will 

give a number (or bullet) and indent a few spaces from the number (or bullet) to where 

you can start typing the excuse.  You can also insert numbers or bullets after you have 

typed your excuse.  To do this, click with your mouse pointer to place your cursor at the 

beginning of the excuse you have typed.  Then click the number or bullet icon.



Note:   If you are using numbers and you find that the wrong number is given when you 

click the icon, you will have to reset the numbers to where you want them to begin.  

To do this, open the Tools pulldown menu and select Bullets and Numbering.  

Double click in the Start at box and erase the number.  Replace it with the number 

you want to use next.





Have you saved your work lately?  Remember how?  

See Activity 1





Changing the Font Style, Size and Color for Each Excuse



When you have completed typing your excuses, highlight each one of them in turn with your 

mouse (Remember how to highlight?  Click and Drag?  If not, check Activity 1, Step 3).  With 

the excuse highlighted, you will change its font style and size.  Remember that you have done 

this already in Activity 2, Step 4: 



*	Click on Format to show the menu and select Character.  At the Font box, click on the 

down arrow to show all the different types of font styles you can choose from.  Scroll 

through them and select one.  The sample window should show you what it will look like.  

*	Click on the arrow next to the points box and select the font point size you desire. 

You can now change the color for this excuse:

*	With the Character window still open, click in the color box.  Select the color you desire.  

Click OK.



Now your poem is just about complete.  Put a title on it if you haven't done so yet and don't 

forget to put your name at the bottom of the poem.   All you have left to do now is to format 

and centre the poem on the page, spell check your document, save your work and print your 

poem. Do you remember how to do this?  If you need help to complete these operations, go 

to Activity 2 and follow the instructions from Step 5 to the end of the activity.



Printing Your Excuses Poem



As this poem uses colored text, you will have to send your document to a color printer.



*	open the File menu and select Print Set-up.  In the window that comes up, you should 

find the name of the color printer in your lab (If you do not know the computers name, 

go to the printer and read it or ask your teacher).  Select the name of the color printer 

and click OK.



Now you can print the document.  Check how it looks first using Print Preview.





For Homework:



This time we will try to write a poem whose words form a certain shape on the page.  When 

we word-process your poem next lesson, we will work on shaping your poem to look like the 

object you desire.  For now you will concentrate on writing a poem about the object you 

choose.  For instance, you might write a poem about an apple (how it looks, feels, tastes, 

sounds when you bite it, smells when it's baking; how you feel when you eat it) or a poem 

about a snowball (how it looks, feels and tastes, the fun you can have with it, how you feel 

when making it and throwing it or being hit by it).  Perhaps write a poem about "Time" or the 

"Passage of Time" - What shape could you use for a poem about Time?  There are limits to 

how well the word processor can make the shape you want, but choose any object you wish 

to write about and go to it!!  Some other suggestions:



*	race car

*	leaf

*	snake

*	tree



 

Activity 4



Word Processing Your Shape Poem

Word Processing Skills used:

*	loading the program

*	entering text from keyboard

*	highlighting text

*	alignment of text - left, right, full and center

*	using Section Layout to vertically center text

*	using the Spell Checker

*	changing the paper orientation

*	saving your document

*	printing your document



Shape Poetry uses words to describe an object or idea and arranges those words in the 

shape of the object or idea being described.  The reader is working with the mental images 

that your words have created and with the image created by the shape of the words on the 

page.  

Snowball





Aging hands 

delve into newborn snow and 

extract, shivering, a memory.  Eager 

hands, once again agile, shaping and mold

 ing,  memories unfolding.  This ball of crystals 

reveals a distant past as fragmented in memory

 as the flakes of which it is formed.  This hand held

sphere, with crystals like shards of broken mirror, 

reflects a child’s rosy face, laughing, snowball in hand, 

taunting and teasing, chasing girls, puffing and wheez

 ing, the past unfurls.  And with once deadly aim, a 

nostalgic throw.  The fleeting memories go and 

smash against  .  .  .  A stop sign on a lonely 

street as memories, splattered,  slide down 

to the ground below, blending with 

the other snow on the ageless, 

slumbering ground



		Michael Coady

								8 1988

 

Before we start to shape your words into the object you have written your poem about, first 

let's enter the text of your poem into the word processor.



If you still have not completed your poem continue to brainstorm on the computer.  Pick the 

object you want to write about and type down ALL the words that come to your mind about 

that object as soon as they pop into your mind.  Worry about deleting or rearranging the 

words afterwards.  If someone else is still working on their poem, perhaps you can brainstorm 

together and bounce ideas off each other.



Now with the poem that you have written about the object of your choice, you will attempt to 

arrange the words of your poem into the shape of the object you are writing about.  To 

position the words on the page so that they take the shape you need you will use a number of 

word processing tools:



*	Alignment (left, right, center and full)

*	Space bar

*	Tab key



With these tools you can create shapes like those on the following pages:

 





tree tree tree

tree tree tree tree tree

tree tree tree tree tree tree tree

tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree

tree tree     tree tree tree tree tree tree tree 

tree tree      tree tree tree tree tree tree tree  

tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree 

tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree tree  

tree tree tree tree tree   tree tree tree tree tree 

tree tree tree tree tree tree tree     tree tree

tree tree tree tree tree tree     tree

tree tree tree tree tree tree tree

tree tree tree tree tree

tree tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree

tree tree tree



 





le

af le

af leaf

leaf    leaf leaf leaf     leaf

leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf

leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leal 

leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf

leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf

leaf              leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf   	     leaf

leaf leaf                leaf leaf leaf leaf                leaf leaf

 leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf 

leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf 

leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf   leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf

leaf leaf leaf leaf  leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf  

leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf 

leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf 

 leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf 

 leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf  leaf leaf leaf leaf 

 leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf  leaf leaf leaf leaf leaf 

l

e

a

f





 

By simply aligning the text to center the tree above was created.  The leaf was a little more 

complicated to create as it required the use of the tab key, the space bar and centering.  You 

will have to use a combination of spacebar and tab key (while the text is set to center 

alignment) and use your eye and judgement to create the shape you want.  



The word processing tools of Text alignment, spacing and tabbing can be operated by 

following easy steps:



1.	To adjust the Alignment of the text, it is easiest to use the icon buttons at the top of your 

screen.  The group of four buttons for alignment may be found on the second row of 

buttons, about 5 buttons in from the right, looking something like:



 



By pressing the first button, each line of text will line up along the left margin - left alignment



By pressing the second button, each line of text will line up along the right margin - right 

alignment



By pressing the third button, each line of text will line up in the center of the page - center 

alignment



By pressing the fourth button, each line of text will spread out to take up the full space from 

the left margin to the right margin - full alignment	



2.	The  Tab key is used to indent / space words apart by a set number of spaces (usually 

about 6).  It may be found on the left hand side of your keyboard above the Caps Lock 

key.



3.	The Space Bar advances the cursor by one space each time it is pressed and is found at 

the bottom of the keyboard.



Let's try an exercise using some of these tools.  Try to duplicate the (very loose) shape of 

race car below.   Its shape was created typing the words "race car" over and over following 

these steps (Remember that "car" must always come after "race" even if it must go on the 

next line):



1.	First set your font to "Utah" or "MS Sans Serif"  14 point (if you don't recall how to do this, 

check Activity 2, step 4).



2.	Align text to center for the first seven lines.  Type 3 words beginning with "race". Enter.  

Type 5 words.  Enter.  Type 6 words. Enter. Type 12 words. Enter.



3.	For the fifth line, type 12 words.  Put a space after every second word. Put cursor at the 

beginning of the first word of the fifth line and hit the space bar about 5 times until it the 

first word of the fifth line lined up under the fourth line.  Put cursor at the end of the line 

and hit Enter.



4.	For the sixth line, type 13 words.  Put a space after every second word. Put cursor at the 

beginning of the first word of the sixth line and hit the space bar about 5 times until it the 

first word of the sixth line hangs out a little further than the fifth line.  Put cursor at the end 

of the line and hit Enter.



5.	For the seventh line,  align text to Left.  Hit the tab key twice.  Type four words. Tab twice 

more.  Space 6 times.  Type 6 words.  Enter.



6.	For the eighth line,  Tab 2 times.  Space 4 times.  Type 3 words.  Tab 4 times.  Type 3 

words. Enter.



7.	For the tenth line,  Tab 2 times. Space 7 times.  Type 2 words.  Tab 4 times.  Space 5 

times.  Type two words. Enter.



 

The race car on your screen should look something like this:





race car race 

car race car race car

race car race car race car 

race car race car race car race car race car race car

     race car  race car  race car  race car  race car  race car

     race car  race car  race car  race car  race car  race car  race

		car race car race		      car race car race car race

		    car race car				race car race

		       car race				     car race





As you type your own poem, the number of words and the length of the words will vary.  You'll 

have to adjust your spacing, tabbing and which lines will be aligned center, left, right or full.



Experiment with Font style, size and color as you try to shape your poem.  Remember when 

you are finished, your title should be at the top in a font size and style that is different and 

your name should be at the bottom, indented with the tab key.



Do you remember how to vertically center your text so that it appears in the center of the page 

from top to bottom?  If not check Activity 2, Step 7.



Be sure to Spell Check and Save your work!  





Printing Your Shape Poem



If the shape of your poem will allow it, you may want to change the orientation of your page 

set-up.  This means that you may print your poem on the page that is landscaped (with the 

page being wider across the top and narrower along the side of the page, in other words, with 

the page turned on its side!) as opposed to the more usual portrait page set-up (with the page 

being narrower across the top).

*	select the Format menu and click on Page Set-up.  At the top of the window, click 

Size and Orientation.

*	In the Orientation box, click on Landscape. Click OK.



Now you can preview the poem to ensure that it fits on a landscaped page and then print it.

 

Activity 5



Creating a Resume / Personal Interests Inventory



Word Processing Skills used:

*	loading the program

*	entering text from keyboard

*	highlighting text

*	cutting and pasting text

*	using the Spell Checker

*	saving your document



	As you move through school and out into the workforce, resumes or CVs (curriculum 

vitaes) become very important.  They are a summary of all your education, skills and 

experiences which may be valuable to prospective employers.  At this point in your education, 

you may not have a great deal of work experience, but you have had certain experiences and 

you do have personal interests, hobbies and valuable skills.  Employers look not only for work 

experience but for a well-rounded person who has had many experiences and interests which 

may prove valuable in the workplace.

	It would be a useful exercise to brainstorm all these skills, interests and experiences 

and try to summarize them in a resume or personal interest inventory.  Work with the student 

at the computer next to you and try to jog each other's memory for the experiences, skills, and 

interests you have had to date.  Typing your findings into the word processor as you go, try to 

think of every significant experience, skill or interest which you have had in the following 

areas:



*	education (your highest level of education achieved [i.e., the year you 

completed last] and  the courses you are presently taking)



*	scholarships or awards (any awards that you have received through school, 

sports or other organizations)



*	summer or part-time jobs (jobs for which you were paid or performed as a 

volunteer and the dates that you held these jobs)



*	work or chores at home (tending the garden, painting the fence, baby-sitting, 

etc. and the periods over which you carried out this work)



*	skills  (abilities or talents that you may have, i.e., computer skills, painting, 

drawing, writing, wood-working, gardening, music, sports, etc.)



*	hobbies or interests  (any past-time which interests you, i.e., constructing 

model cars, wood-working, painting, etc.; any group or organization that you 

belong to. i.e., Boy Scouts / Girl Guides, church groups, sports teams, etc..  Try 

to recall the dates when you were involved in these activities.)



As you think of each activity and experience, type it into the word-processor.  When you have 

brainstormed all the important experiences and activities you have been involved in, now you 

should go back and fill in necessary details or summarize just the important details (deleting 

things that you don't need).  

	For instance, you may have just come up with one word to describe your experience, 

for example, baby-sitting.  You would need to give a little more explanation of this experience 

to show the responsibility you had.  You would probably include information on the age of the 

child you took care of, for how many hours at a time, and the dates during which you had this 

responsibility.

	Perhaps you came up with too much information and will need to summarize and slim it 

down.  For example, if you wrote:



Played on the school football team, played 25 games as striker and 5 games as 

goalie, was assistant captain of the team.



You may want to shorten it to:



Assistant captain of the school football team.



	To shorten the first statement to make it look like the second, you will use the 

highlighting function, the delete key and the cutting and pasting functions.  You remember how 

to perform these functions from our first poetry exercise.  For the cutting and pasting functions 

this time, try using the icons on the button bar (below the menu bar).  For cutting, use the 

scissors icon; for pasting use the clipboard icon.

	To quickly shorten the first statement, you could:



*	highlight "assistant captain of"  and cut it.  



*	Then highlight "played on" and hit the clipboard icon to paste in what you have 

just cut.  Now "played on" is replaced by "assistant captain of".



*	Then highlight all text after "team" and hit the delete button.



The name of the game in describing your experiences is to be brief, giving only the important 

and necessary information.





Don't forget to spell check and save your work in a file called resume.





Activity 6

Word Processing Skills used:

*	loading the program

*	entering text from keyboard

*	highlighting text

*	changing font and size of characters

*	alignment of text - left, right, full and center

*	inserting text from another Word document

*	using the Spell Checker

*	saving your document

*	printing your document



	Now that you have all your significant information collected and summarized, you can 

start the important task of organizing and presenting it.  We will use the word processor to 

format this document so that it looks neat and presentable.

	Your information should be saved in file called resume.    Now you will start a new 

document which will be the framework of your resume.  You will fill in this framework 

document with the information from your resume document.



1.	Load the word program and open the resume document.



2.	Open a new document by opening the File menu and clicking on New, or by clicking 

on the new document icon (the blank sheet icon - the first button on the left of the 

button/tool bar).



3.	Save this new document as resume2



4.	You will start first by aligning to center your name, address and phone number on 

the top of the page.  You remember how to align text using the buttons on the tool 

bar (Activity 4).



5.	Make your name stand out more than the rest of your address.  How could you do 

this?



You will now type into this document all the headings for the information that it will contain.



6.	Align the cursor to the left, hit your caps lock button and type the word EDUCATION.  

Highlight this word with your mouse and hit the bold and underline buttons on the 

tool bar.



7.	Type in other headings like SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS, WORK 

EXPERIENCE, SKILLS, HOBBIES AND INTERESTS.  Bold and underline these 

words as well.



You now have the outline that your resume/personal interest inventory will take.  You have 

only to drop the information into this document to fill it out.  You will copy the information from 

the first document you created (which should be open now) and paste it into the new 

document outline, resume2.



8.	Open the Window menu.  At the bottom of the menu you will see resume.  Click on 

this to bring you to that document. 



9.	Highlight with your mouse all the information you have typed on your education.  Use 

the copy button on the tool bar to make a copy of this (You can also hold down the 

control button and hit the "C" key to copy).



10.	Open the Window menu and click on resume2.  Move your cursor under the 

EDUCATION heading and paste in the information you have just copied by hitting the 

paste/clipboard icon (You can also hold down the control button and hit the "V" key to 

paste).



You will arrange this information in a time sequence, starting with the most recent followed by 

the older information (chronological order).  You will keep the dates to the left and indent the 

information from the left.  



11.	Type the year and hitting the indent button twice, type the information.  As the typing 

scrolls onto the next lines, it will not line up with the tab you set for the first line.  You 

will have to do this manually.  Put the cursor at the beginning of each of the lines 

below the first and hit the indent button twice.



When finished it should look something like this:



1996 - 		Year Seven studies at St. John's Comprehensive 				

		School, Epping, Essex County.  Taking courses in:  	English, 		

	Maths, Science, Socials, French, 	Information Technology, . . .



1995 - 1996		Complete Year Six at name of school, community, 				

	county . . .



You will keep the same format for each of the headings in your resume - dates to the left, 

information indented with the tab key from the date.  Move the cursor below each heading, 

switch to the resume document, copy the necessary information, piece by piece, and paste 

them into the resume2 document in the proper time sequence or chronological order (most 

recent experience first).



Don't forget to save your work every ten minutes or so!



When you have filled in all the necessary information under each heading, run a spell check, 

give your document a final read through, save and print your resume.





For Homework:



As your next project will be to create a newsletter, you will need story and content ideas.  

Write down as many story and news feature ideas that you can come up with:  the title of the 

newsletter, headline stories, interviews, surveys, comic strips, etc..

 

Activity 7



Using the Word Processor to Create a Newsletter



Word Processing Skills used:



*	loading the program

*	entering text from keyboard

*	highlighting text

*	changing font and size of characters

*	alignment of text - left, right, full and center

*	setting out work with tab key

*	inserting text from another Word document

*	using WordArt

*	inserting work from Microsoft Draw

*	laying out work in columns

*	using the Spell Checker

*	saving your document

*	printing your document





For the next couple of classes you will spend time assembling the material to put into your 

newsletter.  Working in small groups, you will brainstorm news ideas and other features to 

include in your newsletter.  



Use the word processor to record your newsletter ideas.  Create a file called news idea and 

keep a list of the stories,and features that your letter will contain.  



When you have finished this list, you can proceed to develop the stories and ideas.   You may 

divide up the duties for developing the features, putting one person in charge of developing a 

story, another in charge of a conducting a survey or interview, etc..  



It would be helpful if you kept one floppy disk for the whole group as a master of all the files 

that will be used in the newsletter.  Name each file in a way that makes it easy to recognize 

what the file contains and as each file is completed copy it on to the master disk.  (Do you 

remember how to specify which drive you are opening from or saving to?)  You will later use 

all those files, cutting and pasting them into the main newsletter document (as you did in 

Activity 6).



When you have assembled all your material and saved it in separate files, you may begin 

formatting and assembling your newsletter.



 

Formatting the Newsletter



You will no doubt have a lot of material to put in your newsletter and you will likely need to 

maximize your space on the page, using as much of the page as possible.  You should 

therefore adjust your left, right, top and bottom margins to be narrower.  (You may remember 

how to do this from formatting your poetry).



The Title



Let's begin with the title.  Type the title of the newsletter, highlight it, select a distinctive font 

and enlarge the font size so that it takes up the width of the page.  



Using Microsoft WordArt



You may wish to make your title more distinctive by using WordArt:



*	Pull down the Insert menu and select Object.  In the window that appears, find and 

select Microsoft WordArt 2.0.



*	Type the title of your newsletter in the box, Enter Your Text Here.



*	Below click on Choose a Shape box and select the shape you want your title to take.



Within WordArt, experiment with the font style, size, color, alignment, stretch, etc. until you 

are satisfied with your title and then hit the Apply button. and then hit OK.  



Editing your WordArt title



If the title is not to your liking, you can edit it:



*	click on the title with your mouse and you should see a grey frame appear.  

*	pull down the Edit menu and select Microsoft WordArt 2.0 Object.  This will bring you 

back to the WordArt window and you can change the design.



You can also change the shape of the your WordArt title, by clicking and dragging on any of 

the little grey blocks in the WordArt object's frame.  For instance, if the title doesn't span the 

whole page, place your cursor on the button on the right side of the frame and click and drag 

the title across the page until it takes up the whole width.



Below the title, in smaller font (perhaps Times New Roman, 12 point), type the name of your 

school and the date.  Place the cursor at the beginning of the date and hit the tab button until 

the date is aligned to the right of the page.

Drawing a Line or Other Object with Microsoft Draw 



Let's separate the newsletter's title from the rest of the paper with a line.  The Word program 

does not have a ready-made line to insert so you'll have to draw one yourself using the 

Microsoft Draw Program



*	Place the cursor of the end of the date and hit return.



*	Click on the Microsoft Draw icon on the toolbar (about the eigth button in from the right - 

with a circle, triangle and square on it).



*	Choose the straight line button, third down the left side of the window.  Click and drag 

yourself a line across the window.



*	Pull down the File menu and select update.  



*	Hold down the ALT key and hit the tab key until you see the Word program icon and 

title come up or just click your mouse inside the Word window to bring the Word 

program window forward again. The line you have drawn should now appear beneath 

the place and date of your newsletter. (If this fails, try copying the line in the Draw 

window and pasting it into place in the newsletter).

 

*	The line will not be long enough to reach across the width of the page.  You will have to 

click and drag it to the right length.  Click on the line with the mouse until the grey frame 

appears.  Click and drag on the right side of the frame until the line reaches across. 



You may want to use this line again to separate stories in your newsletter.  You can either 

repeat the above steps or simply click on the line that you have created, copy it and paste it 

where it is needed.



Note:  You may want to refer back to these steps as you perhaps may use MS Draw to create 

your own pictures or comic strips to include in the newsletter.



The top of your newsletter should look something like this:





The Comprehensive



St. John's Comprehsive School	 			        September 30, 1996

 



OR (see next page)



 

St. John's Comprehensive School, Epping			               September 30, 1996

 



The Main Headline



The next feature to follow may be your main headline.  The headline font is usually the same 

as the font you will use througout the newsletter (perhaps Times New Roman).  Choose a 

larger font size to make the headline stand out.  Center the Headline.  (Note: The smaller 

stories to follow will have smaller font size). 





The Columns



Placing the cursor of the end of the headline and hitting return, you will now need to set out 

your document in columns:



*	Pull down the Format menu and select Columns.  Increase the number of columns to 

four (or less).  Click on the Apply to box and select This Point Forward.  



Note: 	It would be best to look at the document in Page Layout format so 	you know what 

your page will look like:



*	Pull down the View menu and select Page Layout 



Everything after this that you type will appear in column form. The program will continue with 

one column until it fills up the whole page before starting another column.  But you may wish 

to stop a column at a certain length and continue your writing in the next column.  You can 

insert a column break by:



*	placing your cursor at the end of the line where you want to begin a new column and 

pull down the Insert menu, selecting Break.



*	click on Column Break and click OK.





Inserting the Text of the News Story



You are ready to drop text into the columns you have set up.  First thing to do is to set your 

alignment of text to Full.  This allows the text to take up the full width of the column.



You have probably already typed the story into another file which should be on the Master 

disk for your group.  You can copy and paste the text of this file into your newsletter as you 

did in Activity 6, but there is another way to insert the text of a file when you want to use the 

whole file in the order in which it is written:



*	pull down the Insert menu and select File.

*	select the a: drive, select the file you want and click .



Your story will likely appear as one column.  Insert column breaks at points in the column so 

that your story spans the page in the number of columns that you have set up.





Inserting Clipart into Your Newsletter



You may want to include some graphics which may relate to your news story.  Insert clipart 

by:



*	placing your cursor where you want the graphic inserted.



*	pulling down the Insert menu and selecting picture



*	In the Directories box, find the clipart directory and select it.  A number of files 

should appear.  You will have browse through them to see if they suit your purposes.  

You can preview the graphic in the file by selecting a file and clicking the Preview 

button.  



*	If the graphic is suitable, click OK and it will be inserted where your cursor was.





Your first story could look something like the one on the following page:

 

 

 

St. John's Comprehensive School, Epping							September 30, 1996

 

A New School Year Begins at St. John's!



 

Much rejoicing could be heard for 

miles around this month as students 

made their way to school to begin 

a new academic year.  Students 

could not hide their joy (or their 

ear-to-ear grins) as they made their 

way through the doors of their 

beloved school after a refreshing 

summer break.  Some students 

were heard to exclaim, "Thank 

goodness, we don't have to spend 

anymore long hours in the hot 

summer sun playing football!" 

Others were over-

 

 

heard to gleefully say, "I can't wait 

to get back to some challenging 

maths problems and rewarding 

science experiments!"  Still others 

were overjoyed at the prospect of  

tackling such satisfying IT projects 

as newsletters! All over the school  

eager yelps of sheer bliss could be 

heard from the mouths of students 

busily applying themselves the 

happy tasks of their education.  

With all this excitement and 

enthusiasm, it is no wonder that the 

Head Teacher could be heard to 

say:  "These students make coming 

to school each day such an extreme 

pleasure for me and the staff of St. 

John's that I'll ask the Governors to 

lengthen the school year."

 

 



 

When you start shorter news articles, you may use more (and consequently narrower) columns.  

If a news item takes up only one column, you can insert vertical lines between the columns in 

the column set-up.  For example:

 



 

St. John's 

Goes Online

This school year will 

mark the beginning of St. 

John's Comprehen-sive 

School's journey into 

cyberspace.  With the 

acquisition of two full 

multi-media, lap-top 

computers, the school 

now has Internet access 

and email capability for 

students and teachers. 

 

 



 



  YOU KNOW YOU'VE 

BEEN ON THE INTERNET 

TOO LONG WHEN...

 ...you are reading a 

book and look for the 

scroll bar to get  to the 

next page.





 



Net News

From Newfoundland 

comes the SchoolNet 

RINGS Project.  The 

project consists of a 

number of participating 

classes or local RINGS

working together online 

on a project over the 

Internet. Local RINGS 

can be made up of 

groups of students 

anywhere in the world. 

 



Life on Mars 

Latest development in 

the alien-obsessed 

Summer of '96: Martians 

might not just be a 

Saturday-morning car-

toon figment; there could 

be life on Mars!  In 

August, a meteor from 

Mars fell to earth.  

Scientists found fossils of 

organic  life which 

suggests that there once 

was life on Mars.

 



An example of what your newsletter could look like can be found on the 

following page:

 

 

You now have all the skills you need to to produce 

an impressive looking newsletter.  All you need to 

do now is apply your creativity and play around with 

the layout.  Good luck!